Duke Chapel standing over campus building

Category: Multimedia

YouTube Publishing Checklist

After you’ve produced a great piece of content, you want as many people as possible to see it. That’s where optimization comes in. The following tips will help people discover and engage with your videos.

Metadata

In just a few minutes, you can make easy adjustments to your titles, tags and descriptions that will help YouTube index your content—and help you show up in search results and suggested videos.

  • Descriptive title: Be sure to use descriptive words at the beginning of your title and keep titles concise. Move branding words (like the name of your department or class) and episode numbers to the end of the title.
  • Description: Get an accurate description of your video in the first few sentences—that’s what will appear in search results. Also, make sure you use some keywords in your description.
  • Channel link: Providing a link to your channel in the description helps drive visitors to your channel page.
  • Playlist link: Including a link to a playlist in your description encourages viewers to stick around longer and try some of your other videos. Create playlists by thinking, “If I was a viewer and loved this video, what other videos on this channel would I love?”
  • Subscribe link: Fans are more likely to subscribe to your channel if you personally suggest it to them through your video description.
  • Social media links: Adding links to your social media (Twitter, Facebook, etc.) in your description gives fans another way to interact with you.
  • Tags: Make sure your title, description and tags share some keywords to improve searchability. Using a set of standard tags for your channel each time you upload will help with your search engine rankings, too. The standard tags should apply to most of the content you produce. For example, you can tag all videos with “Duke University.”

Annotations

Annotations are clickable links and comments overlaid on your YouTube video. They take a little time to master, but they can drive viewers to more content, increase engagement on your videos and earn you more subscribers.

  • Link to other videos: Be sure to link to at least one other video of yours. You may want to link to related content, other videos in your series or playlists. By having an annotation link to a playlist you are increasing your chances of viewers watching a series of your content. If a viewer watches a playlist, you can get 10 views for the price of one!
  • Make a subscribe button: Viewers are more likely to subscribe to you if you personally suggest it to them through annotations.
  • Set links to open in a new window: By setting your annotation links to open in a new window, you can allow your viewers to come back to your video and hit the Play button again, right where they left off.

More to Consider

There are other things you can do to make your videos more shareable and widely useable.

  • Captioning: By having captions you can reach viewers with hearing loss or those who are watching while at work. You can either use YouTube’s auto-captioning service or write your own captions. (Your own captions are better, but take more time.) Captions also act as additional metadata, which helps your video show up in more places on YouTube.
  • Allow comments and ratings: Allowing “likes” can help your video spread because other YouTube users can share which videos they’ve liked. Comments are a way for your viewers to interact with your videos and can increase engagement.
  • Use the Education tab: You can enter lecturer information, course material and learning objectives if appropriate for your video.

Want more information and a deeper look at YouTube best practices? Check out the YouTube Creator Playbook.

Publicize Your Live Webcast

Communications offices across Duke have begun webcasting their events to reach larger audiences. Although Duke does not have a centralized webcasting service, it does offer a number of resources to help you publicize your online event. Duke University Communications offers the following tips.

General Advice

If you are new to webcasting and have general questions about when it makes sense to use it, and how best to proceed, contact ONC’s Sonja Foust.

Permission

For event participants not employed by Duke, you should get written permission to record the event. Do not record an event against a participant’s wishes. Duke’s Scholarly Communications Officer provides sample releases in his Scholarly Communications Toolkit. For productions that will capture audience members in a significant way, for example a question-and-answer period with a speaker, it is recommended that you announce at the event that it is being webcast.

Technical Support

Your school or unit may have someone with the necessary technical skills to help you set up a webcast, or you can explore the Office of Information Technology’s Audio/Video Consultation services.

Production

If you need help with video production or webcasting, or want to use a professional studio, contact Duke Media Services.

Platforms

Recommended webcasting platforms for events include YouTube Live. Google’s Hangouts on Air can be a good platform for a live, multi-site webcast. (For promotion ideas, see Google’s Public events and events on air.)

Events@Duke

A quick and easy way to bring your event to the attention of a larger audience is by listing it on Events@Duke, the university’s online calendar (which you should be using anyway, even if the event is not webcast). Be sure to mark your event as belonging to the “Webcast” category, along with any other categories, and include the appropriate URL in the webcast field.

Embed the Webcast on your Site

If you use YouTube Live or Hangouts on Air, you can embed the video player on your website much as you would with a recorded YouTube video. Doing so brings the event to your entire community while also enhancing your site.

Social Media

Use Twitter, Facebook and other social media tools to promote your webcast. Twitter is especially good for last-minute notifications (using the hashtag #dukelive). Of course, you’ll also want to publicize the event on your website, with email lists and by using other familiar tools. For questions about social media, contact University Communications’ Sonja Likness.

Coordinate with University Communications

If your event will be of special interest to a campus-wide, regional or national audience, ONC may be able to help you publicize it. In addition to the people named above, contact Keith Lawrence for assistance with media outreach or Geoffrey Mock for coverage in Duke Today.

Wrap Up

Once your webcast is finished you can post the recording to the Duke YouTube and/or iTunes sites. For assistance with that, contact the YouTube team at ONC.

Plan Ahead!

Do not expect any of these tips to be of much help unless you plan ahead. Please provide several days’ notice to enable University Communications, Duke Media Services or others across campus to provide the assistance you need. Don’t wait until the last minute.

Filming Guidance

Selecting your Background

  • Match the location of the interview with its topic.
  • Shoot in a deep room so the background blurs out.
  • Look for interesting compositions by using dramatic perspectives in the backgrounds. Walls should recede into the background at an angle.
  • Remove visual clutter from the background but leave in objects that are relevant to the interview and/or provide visual interest without being a distraction.

Samples of people in front of different backgorunds

Positioning People and Lights

  • Set up the interviewer to be slightly off to the left or right of the camera, depending on which way you want the interviewee looking.
  • Set up the interviewee using the rule of thirds: divide the screen into thirds vertically and align the interviewee along one of the dividing lines, leaving more room in the direction he is looking.
  • Using a three-point light kit, set the key light to illuminate the side of the face with more breathing room, the fill light on the side closest to the edge, and the rim light behind the interviewee angled down to illuminate their head and shoulders.
  • Make sure the interviewee is the brightest element of the shot.

Lighting diagram

Positioning the Second Camera

When using two cameras, set Camera 2 closer and a little more off-axis than Camera 1. Make sure both cameras are on the same side of the interviewee, either left or right. Don’t put one on each side. This is called breaking the axis and it can be jarring for the viewer.

Selecting your Camera and Settings

  • When possible, shoot with a Canon 5D Mark III or a comparable DSLR camera with nice lenses.
  • Set the camera to shoot 1080p (1920×1080) at 24fps.
  • Set custom white balance equally on both cameras.
  • Shoot with a wide enough aperture to reduce depth of field and blur the background.
  • Set focus to manual. (The 5D automatically shoots with manual focus.)
  • Ensure the depth of field is deep enough to keep the subject in focus if they lean in or out (between F4 and 10, generally).
  • Extra credit: If you own your camera (not renting), download the “flat” cinestyle color profile and shoot neutral. This will give the editor full control over all color correction in post production.

Camera Movement

  • Camera 1 should be set on a fluid head tripod and the operator should utilize a very minimal “floating” technique.
  • Camera 2 should be set on a fluid head tripod and the operator should utilize a very minimal “floating” technique.
  • Alternatively, Camera 2 could be on a shoulder mount with very little movement.

Audio

  • For stationary interviews, use a wired lavaliere mic. For interviews in which the interviewee is moving, use a wireless lavaliere mic. Hide the wire underneath the interviewee’s clothing.
  • Turn off all devices that beep or buzz.
  • DSLRs don’t record high quality audio, even if you use a nice XLR mic and plug it into the mini mic port on the DSLR. So, make sure that audio is being sent to a separate mixer or recorder like the Zoom H4N or Tascam.
  • Make sure someone is always monitoring audio to make volume adjustments, catch any background noises that are going to be a problem, and to make sure the mic doesn’t drop out (batteries can die, and equipment can malfunction).
  • For outdoor interviews, watch out for wind! It can sound much louder through a mic than to the ear.

Photography Vendors

Learn more about contract terms, independent contractor forms and how to procure and pay from Duke Financial Services.

Photographers are listed alphabetically in each category

Editorial & Event Photographers

Derek Anderson
dlanderson.com
(618) 203-2909
Duke references: Sally Hicks

Bruce DeBoer
brucedeboer.com
Bruce@OryxCreatives.com
(919) 523-6385
Duke references: Shawn Rocco

Lissa Gotwals
lissagotwals.com
lg@lissagotwals.com
(919) 740-0536
Duke references: Sally Hicks

Alec Himwich
www.alechimwich.com
alec.himwich@gmail.com
(919) 943-8249
Duke references: Jennifer Prather, Katy Clune

Ken Huth
huthphoto.com
ken@huthphoto.com
(919) 619-8626
Duke references: Tori Hall, Michael Evans 

Colin Huth
photoc4.com
(919) 869-4422
Duke references: Tori Hall, Michael Evans

Justin Kase Conder
jkase.com
justin@jkase.com
(919) 633-4737
Duke references: Erin Hull 

Alex Maness
alexmaness.com
alex@alexmaness.com
(919) 707-6121
Duke references: Sally Hicks, Deirdre Shipman

Brian Mullins Photography
www.brianmullinsphotography.com
www.raleighcommercialphotos.com
contact@brianmullinsphotography.com
(919) 414-0869
Duke references: James Todd, Meghan Rushing; hired for Nov 2018 event by Celeste Ferguson

Annemie Tonken
megapixie.com
annemie@megapixie.com
919-886-5388
Duke references: Carolyn Gerber

Les Todd (retired from Duke Photography July 2016)
lestodd.photoshelter.com
Ltodd1000@gmail.com
(919) 725-3637
Duke references: Deborah Hill, Tori Hall, Bryan Roth, Jenna Brown, Aaron Wellborn, Shawn Rocco, Sally Hicks,  Alison Jones, Steve Hartsoe, Jeannine Sato, Mandy Dixon, Susan Kauffman, Paul Grantham

York Wilson Photography
yorkwilsonphoto.com
(919) 368-5079
Duke references: Sally Hicks

Event Photographers

Kelley Bennett
kelley.e.bennett@gmail.com
Duke references: Amy Finnegan

Alexandrea Lassiter of Copper Key Photo
https://www.copperkeyphoto.com/
contact@copperkeyphoto.com
(646) 207-8642
Duke reference: Robin Smith

Kevin Seifert Photography
kevinseifertphotography.com
kevin@kevinseifertphotography.com
Duke references: Celeste Hodges (headshots and numerous events), Eric Ferreri, Mandy Dixon, Shawn Rocco

Jim Wallace
w4ksz@yahoo.com
(919) 309-0360
Duke references: Deborah Hill, Sally Hicks, Susan Kauffman, Paul Grantham

Editorial Photographers

Alex Boerner
alexboerner.com
alex@alexboerner.com
(772) 233-5639
Duke references: Duke Performances, Shawn Rocco

Justin Cook
justincookphoto.com
cook.justin@gmail.com
(919) 612-6478
Duke references: Shawn Rocco, Alison Jones

Madeline Gray
madelinegrayphoto.com
madelinegray@gmail.com
(740) 591-2680
Duke references: Scott Huler

Ben McKeown
benmckeown.com
(919) 656-3003
Duke references: Shawn Rocco

Raul Rubiera
rubieraphoto.com
rrubiera@yahoo.com
(910) 916-3853
Duke references: April Dudash, Shawn Rowe, Greg Phillips (Fuqua)

Brian Strickland
brianstrickland.zenfolio.com/
(919) 273-1020
Duke references: Ellen deGraffenreid 

Perfect Visuals
perfectvisuals.com
info@perfectavisuals.com
(336) 736-7270
Duke references: Shawn Rocco

DC Based Photographers

Sam Kittner
Duke references: Kathy Neal

New to the list (no Duke references yet)

Kent Corley
kentcorley.com
photo@kentcorley.com
(919) 616-7679

Scott Faber Photography
scottfaber.com
scott@scottfaber.com 

Alex Kolyer
alexkolyer.com
alex@alexkolyer.com
(786) 556-7119

Leon Godwin
leon@lionnerd.com 

Susan Murray
studio@SP-murray.com
(919) 219-3347

Kate Pope
katepope.com
hello@katepope.com

Duke Communicators are invited to submit the names of photographers to be considered for this list. We also welcome feedback about your experiences working with freelance photographers. Suggestions will be reviewed quarterly along with feedback and the list will be updated accordingly. Please email input and suggestions to photos@duke.edu. Thank you for sharing your input and helping to make our network even stronger.

Video Resources

We’ve pulled together a list of the best resources available for Duke’s video community below. Take a look!

Guidelines, Policies, Best Practices

Hardware & Software

Training

  • HR Special Development Programs – Offers numerous professional development workshops, including ones on certain multimedia tools.
  • Lynda online training tutorials – Duke students, faculty and staff can access the entire lynda.com online training library through a university-wide site license. Topics include graphics, video editing and training on specific video editing software like Adobe Premiere and Final Cut Pro.
  • ProComm – Professional development program for communications professionals at Duke.
  • OIT training – Both in-person and online training to support Duke students, staff and faculty.
  • OIT Tech Tutors – Looking for dedicated help getting started or completing a multimedia (audio/video), graphics or web design project you are working on? OIT is here for you!
  • Center for Documentary Studies – Offers continuing education courses on film/video and multimedia.
  • YouTube help center – Getting started guide and searchable help index.

Peer-to-Peer Learning

Consulting

  • Center for Instructional Technology – Helps instructors and students find innovative ways to use technology.
  • OIT Consultations – Expertise to assist with audio/video purchasing or integration projects, consultation on available audio/video rentals and resources in the area.
  • Office of News and Communications – Works with the news media and others to highlight the activities of Duke’s faculty, students and staff.
  • StoryHunter – Hire freelance journalists and videographers through Public Affairs and Government Relations’ subscription. Contact Laura Brinn for details.

Producing Video

Music Resources

Footage Resources

Public Domain Images

DSLR Camera

Video Production at Duke

Video is one of our most powerful tools for telling stories and reaching university audiences. Navigating the possibilities of video takes many kinds of skills and tools. We’ve outlined some best practices and solutions below.

Production

Process

Video production can be a long sequence with many phases. These guides can help you and your video subjects through the process.

  • Video Production Timeline
  • Filming Guidelines
  • Interview Guidelines
  • What to Wear on Camera
  • Release Form

Tools & Software

Discounted licenses of some video-editing programs may be purchased through Duke, and many tools are available from various offices and initiatives. Learn more about available video tools & software.

For ease-of-use, we’ve also produced Duke-branded video project templates for Adobe Premiere Pro CC, Final Cut X and iMovie, which are available in the Video Graphics Package.

Distribution

Online Hosting with YouTube

With 1 billion regular users and an estimated 1 trillion hours of uploaded footage, YouTube is our preferred hosting solution for online, public video content. By hosting your videos on YouTube, you will be tapping a source that’s highly preferred in Google’s search results. Using a Duke-affiliated channel allows institutional channels to share and amplify videos from your organization.

Sharing & Native Hosting on Social Media

Though videos hosted on sites like YouTube can often be shared on social media, some platforms boost the visibility of videos that are natively uploaded over posts that link externally-hosted videos. Other platforms, such as Instagram, only allow native video uploads. In cases where you would like to use native video, consult the target social media platform’s documentation for specific instructions and guidelines.

Graphics Package

The Duke Video Graphics Package is accessible to members of the Duke community through WebDAM. A pre-packaged, editable graphics kit is available for Premiere Pro users along with the individual assets for use with other video editing software. See the Video Graphics Instructions document in the folder for additional information and examples.

Download the Duke Video Graphics Package

Campus Footage

A B-roll library containing a variety of footage from across campus is available to the Duke community in via Duke’s WebDAM. A NETID is required for access.

Duke B-roll Library

Filming Locations

From meeting spaces to theaters to natural areas, a variety of venues are available for capturing video across campus. We’ve compiled a list of these locations along with notes about the area and contact details for reserving the space. A NETID is required for access.

Filming Locations at Duke

Social Media Guidelines

The purpose of these guidelines is to help Duke communicators understand how Duke policies apply to digital communications such as blogs and social media, and to guide them in using social media platforms. The guidelines apply to material that Duke communications offices and related units publish on Duke-hosted websites and branded Duke unit profiles such as those on Facebook and Instagram. Any questions about these guidelines should be directed to socialmedia@duke.edu. Duke Health employees should refer to the specific standards and guidelines established for Duke Health sites and digital channels.

Photography at Duke

When choosing photography for your project, a combination of thematic stock photos and custom photoshoots should be able to provide all necessary images. When choosing (and shooting) images, look for:

  • interesting, asymmetric compositions
  • “white” or negative space
  • utilize close crops
  • diversity of subjects both in race and gender
  • subject matter of off-campus images should be topical

Avoid excessive shots of campus architecture. Instead, choose classrooms, students, or natural elements (plants, sky, etc.). When applicable, incorporate current event images to convey a theme or topic. Look for editorial images instead of banal “stock” images. Lastly, use global images as much as possible. Try not to limit industry/initiative images to a U.S. focus.

Portraits

Portraits should be forward-facing with the following attributes:

  • quiet composition
  • personal
  • looking toward camera

Alumni portraits should be off-campus (to illustrate our impact in the real world) and, when at all possible, include props from their industry. When portraits occur on campus, choose interesting backgrounds such as artwork or the natural world.

Other Things to Consider

Focus

Create a point of focus such that the background blurs a bit, but avoid the image getting too “soft.”

Expression

Can be anything, really. Just try and capture your subject at ease, with their most natural expression.

Background

Be creative, look for backgrounds that are graphic, quiet, or artful.

Proximity

Try the extremes; either really close or really far can be unusual and wonderful.

Candids/In-context

Photographs that make the user feel as though they are a part of the action can be very impactful. It gives the viewer a sense of being a part of the setting rather than simply viewing.

Events: It may seem like photos of speakers, lectures or symposiums provide context but the goal is to differentiate it from all other photos of event speakers. Find the interaction opportunities, shoot from different angles.

Scenic

spring scenes on West Campus – Duke Chapel

Duke is an incredibly beautiful place and you’ll find no shortage of inspirational locations for breathtaking photography. When considering scenic imagery, consider the time of day for lighting, the traffic pattern of the area and if there may be any no-go zones as part of the photo (i.e. health system

Obtaining Signed Releases

Most spaces on campus are considered public domain and therefore releases of photos/video captured in these areas (the Quads, grounds, spaces open to the public) do not require a signed consent form.

Signed releases must be obtained from all people photographed during formal photo shoots and video shoots for promotional materials.

The more an image easily identifies a specific individual, the more likely it is that written permission from the person photographed is necessary. If you plan to attach the name of a participant to a particular photograph in promotional materials, make sure that you have a signed release from that person. Group and crowd shots, where individuals are not easily identifiable, do not require specific permission from all individuals appearing in the image you are planning to use.

HIPPA Duke Health Form

University Photo Release Form

Releases should be stored WITH the image file and not exist separate from the photo.

Photography Resources

Duke’s Asset Management System (NETID required) is a wonderful resource of over 7,000 images. It is refreshed regularly with community-sourced photos as well as new imagery captured by the University Communications team.

Duke University Archives Yearlook Flickr site is a great resource for archival photos of Duke through the years.

Refer to the compiled list of Photography Vendors to find resources to fill your photography needs. You can also review Duke Financial Services’ contractor guidelines and learn how to procure and pay for services.

Can I use that picture?

“It’s on Google. I can use it, right?”

It’s tricky. Use the infographic from The Visual Communication Guy to determine where content falls on the copyright spectrum.

11 Music Resources for Your Storytelling Needs

Free Resources

Cheap Resources

Not Cheap…

Another list of resources from Columbia

Audio Resources

Duke Audio Community


Duke has an active community of podcasters and audio producers who produce a wide range of shows. Learn more from your Duke peers through the Duke Audio Working Group. The group meets monthly to share works in progress and exchange tips on tools, techniques, storytelling and more.

Email Samiha Khanna to join the group or find out more: samiha.khanna@duke.edu.

Duke Recording Spaces

The Multimedia Project Studio at Bostock Library includes an audio booth available free of charge by reservation to members of the Duke community.

Outside Sources for Ordering Audio Equipment

  1. B&H Photo/Video
  2. Sweetwater

Some Options for Hosting Your Podcast

  1. Warpwire (Free; supported by Duke OIT)
  2. SoundCloud (Free, but includes limits on total audio space; not supported by Duke OIT)
  3. Libsyn (Modest fee; not supported by Duke OIT)

Transcription Apps and Services

  1. Trint.com
  2. Rev.com
  3. Otter.ai

How To

  1. Create your own audiogram
  2. Record phone calls
  3. Prepare for a radio interview

Continue Your Audio Education

  1. Duke Center for Documentary Studies– Offers occasional continuing education courses and summer workshops in audio and podcasting.
  2. Duke Audio Working Group – Monthly meeting where Duke community members share tips, ideas and inspiration and provide one another with feedback. Sign up by emailing Alison Jones: alison.jones@duke.edu.
  3. LinkedIn Learning – Free tutorials for Duke community members on audio editing software (Adobe Audition, Hindenburg, Protools).

Sources for Free or Cheap Music

Free

  1. Creative Commons
  2. Library of Congress National Jukebox
  3. YouTube Audio Library

Cheap

  1. Sound of Picture
  2. And find more music resources listed in the Duke Communicator Toolkit.

Other Useful Links

  1. Transom.org – Great source of information on audio tools, technique and inspiration on everything from interview techniques torecording phone calls.
  2. Association of Independents in Radio (AIR) – Membership network of audio freelancers; good source of advice and information on audio challenges and opportunities
  3. NPR station list – for booking remote studios.
  4. Hot Pod – Newsletter about podcasting trends.
  5. How Sound podcast – “The backstory to great radio storytelling”

A Note About Accessibility

Please remember the hearing impaired and post a transcript along with your podcast (see above for suggested apps and services).

Subscribe to Duke podcasts!

Below are a few. Find more Duke podcasts here:

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